Do oncology outpatients need chaplaincy services?

Journal article


Cedar, SH, Mitchell, J, Watts, J and Hilborn, M (2018). Do oncology outpatients need chaplaincy services? Health and Social Care Chaplaincy. 6 (1), pp. 82-94.
AuthorsCedar, SH, Mitchell, J, Watts, J and Hilborn, M
Abstract

© Equinox Publishing Ltd 2018. Holistic patient-centred care is the aim of health services in the United Kingdom delivered through the 6Cs. Chaplains can offer aspects of this through compassionate care of the patient, particularly when a person is facing a life-limiting prognosis. This study firstly evaluated patient awareness and use of chaplaincy services in two oncology settings; Inpatient and Outpatient. Outpatients had not previously been offered chaplaincy services. Secondly, the demand and needs for a chaplaincy intervention was investigated with patients who expressed a spiritual or religious belief and had received a chaplaincy visit. Results indicated that half of the patients seen in the first evaluation identified with a spiritual/ religious belief and both Outpatients and Inpatients had a similar demand for chaplaincy visits. Those receiving a chaplaincy visit before being evaluated generally requested further visits. Based on these results we have now established a chaplaincy visiting service in the Outpatient chemotherapy suites to try to match demands.

Year2018
JournalHealth and Social Care Chaplaincy
Journal citation6 (1), pp. 82-94
ISSN2051-5553
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1558/hscc.31826
Publication dates
Print24 Dec 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited05 Feb 2019
Accepted24 Dec 2018
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/86824

Accepted author manuscript

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