Innocent Suspects Lie! When, Why, and What Happens

Conference paper


Colwell, K., Memon, A., Talwar, V., Sweeney, K., Tekin, S. and Derosa, R. (2020). Innocent Suspects Lie! When, Why, and What Happens. 2020 American Psychology-Law Society Annual Meeting. USA
AuthorsColwell, K., Memon, A., Talwar, V., Sweeney, K., Tekin, S. and Derosa, R.
TypeConference paper
Abstract

Innocent suspects lie to avoid suspicion, which makes them appear guilty. This study examined a large sample of Witnesses, Innocent Suspects, and Guilty Suspects to determine what and when each will omit in order to avoid suspicion. Two theoretical models addressed disclosure decisions and ratings of honesty and guilt following investigative interviews of a realistic mock theft. Most innocent respondents chose to lie during the interview, and this lying backfired. The nature, reasons, and consequences of lying by omission will be discussed.

Year2020
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
File Access Level
Open
Publication dates
Print05 Mar 2020
Publication process dates
Deposited15 Oct 2019
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/882zz

Accepted author manuscript

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